Friday, November 13, 2015

Blue velvet

A few words loosely based  the photo at Friday Fictioneers with a nod to this weeks Sunday Scribblings 2 where the given word is Velvet (sorry Rochelle!)

 PHOTO PROMPT – © J Hardy Carroll.










May I have the next dance please?

The first words  he said to her 

The last words she said to him.

Now he kneels on the damp grass beside her grave. 

A chill breeze ruffles the ball gown clutched in his arms.

His fingers trace the words carved in the cold grey slab. 


She wore blue velvet. 
Bluer than velvet were her eyes.







.

13 comments:

  1. Awww, that's sad. I remember that song. My mom used to play it.

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  2. Very sad, but also very beautiful. Your sunday scribblings prompt blends so seamlessly into your story/poem that I doubt it would annoy anyone. The connection is not forced, which is often seen when prompts are combined.

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  3. What a sad and sentimental piece from you today Keith. I see you have left Rosey to titillate us instead.

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  4. This one tears at the heart. ".... the ball gown clutched in his arms" oozes a visual that takes us to his pain.
    Wonderfully done ...!!! We need happeier prompts. ��
    My hubby created a copper Polish flag sculpture for Bobby Vinton. His son with his wife, son and grandmother stayed with us during Hurricane Charlie. It was quite and experience. Who could forget his singing of Blue Velvet?
    Hvae a wonderful weekend ...
    Isadora ��

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  5. Great job weaving the two challenges. I like how you stated so simply his first words and her last. Very effective. Well done!

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  6. Well I can't help but think of the film - and wonder why he is clutching the dress - and their last words..hmm..the photo is strangely atmospheric in its blandness - you definitely drew out the best (or worst?) of it

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  7. Dear Keith,

    I love that song. You did manage to weave the prompts well, however, it doesn't change my opinion of multi prompt stories.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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  8. What a touching poem & sad situation, Keith!

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  9. Clever connections and good piece.

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  10. Very sad. The remembered dialogue is so celverly used to evoke the emotion in this. Very well done.

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  11. Beautiful. Your piece is a far cry from the creepy David Lynch movie by the same name. :) Well done.

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  12. Sad, although lovely story, Keith. Also a lovely song. I remember it when it first became popular. Well done. --- Suzanne

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  13. Sad but beautiful ... I too remember that song ... nicely penned. Bastet

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