Wednesday, December 13, 2017

.

Post 1649. Tuesday December 12




What’s today? Monday? No, it’s Friday because I just ate fish and chips. There’s my plate. See? Yes, Friday.

I had a good memory once. I used to take part in quizzes.

I did – didn’t I?

Why is this happening to me? Why me? It makes me so ANGRY!

Sorry, sorry, I didn’t mean to shout.

It’s like mind is trying to look through a misted window. It makes out shapes but not the detail.

You wouldn't understand, why should you?



Who are you anyway?

My son? What son?

You’re an imposter. You are just after my money.

Sorry son. Sorry. Please forgive me.


My nurse is lovely. Jenny. No, Jacqui. I think.

You’d like her. She has the most beautiful black hair.

She understands me. She wipes my misty window, and for a few precious moments, everything makes sense.

But then it steams up again and I forget what I remembered.

Anyway, cheer up. We're having fish and chips tonight!  Do you want some? Julie will be bringing it soon.

She has the most beautiful blonde hair.




Thanks, Priceless Joy for hosting and Yarnspinnerr for the picture.


Word count 175










.

22 comments:

  1. Oh my God. Alzheimers it looks like. Brutal :-(

    ReplyDelete
  2. It scares me to think, one day it shouldn't turn out be my life story.
    Poignant take on the prompt Keith.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ansds so say all of us. Thank you Anagha.

      Delete
  3. It’s frightening, and it’s also very sad.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Interesting take on the photo. I would have been lecturing on fat content. But your story is a sobering one for us old timers. It's a scary thought.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm just hoping it's not a prophetic story Denise!

      Delete
  5. A powerful use of the unusual prompt Keith.

    ReplyDelete
  6. A very poignant story! Dementia is so sad. Great story, Keith!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Its such a scary scenario isn't it. Nicely conveyed Keith.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Having never known anyone with this condition, it was a bit of a gamble writing about it. I can only hope I've done it justice. Thanks Michael.

      Delete
  8. I have seen this dreadful illness all to often, in its many differing forms. ... So to me your story was well told.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Heartbreakingly captured. The narration felt very real and powerful.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Very well done! The hardest part of Alzheimer's is when they realize they're losing bits and pieces of reality. Father-in-law had Alzheimer's, my mother-in-law had dementia. As his case progressed, Dad thought Mom was his mother.
    With Mom yesterday didn't register but she never lost track of who we were or basically where she was. Though she coouldn't remember the date, even in her last years she could still do the math: "I was born in 1908; if it's 2000 now then I'm 92."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As I mentioned in my comment following your piece, I have no experience of these conditions and I'm not even sure of the difference. I cannot imagine how it must feel witnessing their deteriation. My father died with little or no warning, and my Mum is in her 90's and is bright as a button metally and phsically.Thank you so much for dropping by Christine.

      Delete
  11. Myristicin and macelignan (essential oils in mace)have been proved to reduce the degradation of neural pathways and cognitive function that commonly affects individuals with either dementia or Alzheimer.

    Loved your take on this one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Once again it's natural remedies to the rescue. Thank you so much for your interesting comment YS - and for the photo of course!

      Delete

COMMENTS ARE CURRENTLY TAKING ABOUT 30 SECONDS TO PUBLISH. Patience is a virtue!

Dear WORDPRESS friends. If you are having difficulty posting please 'Comment as' either:-

a) Name/URL
b) Anonymous with your name included in your comment.

Thank you!