Wednesday, November 01, 2017

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Post 1628. Wednesday November 1




'Make sure you behave yourself' said mum as she handed Tommy over to grandpa for a couple of hours.

He only left him for a few moments to take a telephone call in the hall. He cut his conversation short when he heard clattering coming from the lounge. A look of horror came over his face when he saw Tommy playing ten-pins on the floor with his precious vases. He said nothing, just knelt down beside him.

'Why are you crying?' asked Tommy. 'They aren't broken'. Grandpa traced the shape of a heart in the scattered ashes on the carpet.

'Kids will be kids my darling' he whispered.



Thanks to Rochelle for hosting and Sarah Ann Hill tor the photograph.





57 comments:

  1. If there is something in a room that is valuable and must not be touched, children are attracted to it like a heat-seeking missile. One of the fundamental truths of life and parenting. Excellent take Keith.

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    1. So they are as I'm sure we'e all encountered! Cheers Iain

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  2. I think you might be missing 'to' before Grandpa. And I'm a bit confused about how if they fell over they didn't break? A sweet story.

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    1. Duly corrected! So often even after proof reading several times silly little errors creep through! Thanks Claire

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  3. Nicely done, Keith, touchingly realistic.

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  4. Hah. Nearly everything I own of any value is crammed into the china cabinet, except for the tea cart.

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    1. Oh wait. Ashes? Like human ashes? Ewww.

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    2. Yes, Denise, his wife's ashes! Should have kept then behind closed doors like your pieces of value.

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  5. Another argument for not keeping the ashes of loved ones around, at least where they're accessible to children. Oy.

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  6. Beautiful story, Keith. Maybe Grandpa should've used the attic.

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    1. Maybe. too late now though. Cheers Varad.

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  7. Grandpa could neither reprimand the child, nor repair the damage. He must have only blamed himself.

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    1. I'm certain his late wife won't blame him or the kids. Thanks Reena.

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  8. Only Grandpa's heart is broken, i think.

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  9. I think this is in reality a good reminder that life goes on... maybe there's a lesson for him

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    1. There's nothing to be gained by dwelling in the past. Cheers brudberg.

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  10. Dear Keith

    Sad but charming story. Nicely done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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    1. Kind of you to say so Rochelle, thank you.

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  11. Ouch. I liked his reaction, though. Quite sad.

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  12. I love how grandparents are ever kind and patient with their grandchildren, no matter what.
    Lovely story!

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    1. We are - now I'm showing my age! Cheers moon.

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  13. I'm sure Grandma would understand. Very poignant scene. - Russell

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    1. Of that. I have no doubt! Thanks for your comment Russell

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  14. Oh no, oh no! The innocence of a child and the pain of the old one!

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    1. They usually cancel one another out! Thanks for dropping by,

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  15. You made me smile .... lovely read.

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  16. One does take a risk in keeping such items within the reach of children (even if only over for a visit!)
    I think it is a good sign for him to embrace the rest of his life. Kind of like Vianne in "Chocolat" had to do when her mother's ashes were knocked over by her daughter...

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    1. One of my favourite books and not a bad film either! Thanks for your insightful comment Dale

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  17. Oh dear. Perhaps that vase should have been kept hidden in preparation for Tommy's arrival!

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    1. Good idea in retrospect! Cheers Vinay

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  18. I guess it was Grandma who had collected the vases, so of course that's where he wanted her ashes. Good tale, Keith.

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    1. She could well have done Penny! Thanks so much.

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  19. It's amazing the number of fictioneers that thought of these as good urns. Good tale- I'm sure gandma won't mind :)

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    1. One good urn deserves another! Cheers Vivian.

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  20. OMG! What a final line. You really got me.

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    1. In a good way I hope Alice! Thanks so much.

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  21. Scattered ashes. Two stunning words make this story memorable.

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  22. Beautiful story but gosh he had a lot of dearly departed on display. I liked Grandpa's reaction. Despite his hurt and despair he didn't lash out and make the kid feel bad.

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    1. It didn't even occur to me that he might have ashes in all of his vases! As for 'lashing out' I don't think his dearly departed wife would have liked him to have done that. Thank you Irene.

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  23. Great take on this prompt. I actually thought about making one of them an urn for ashes, but couldn't seem to make it work. You did a terrific job of it.

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    1. Thanks Sandra, I'm pleased you liked it.

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  24. Lovely, poignant story, Keith. Of course he forgave his grandson!

    Susan A Eames at
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

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  25. Ouch! I'm so glad he didn't get angry with the boy and I love the heart drawn into the ashes. I bet grandma is smiling.

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  26. Damn, Keith. Gave me chills.

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  27. Never keep a deceased loved one within reach of a small child, is my motto. Nicely done Keith

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  28. Touching and poignant. Poor grandpa, and Tommy. That is going to be one difficult explanation.

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  29. Awww...i expect Grandma would have understood.
    Good one, Keith.

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