Thursday, May 04, 2017

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Post 1526. Thursday May 4

Six Sentence Stories

The ancient Romans saw the wishbone of a chicken as a symbol of luck and passed on the tradition of snapping it to the English during their travels across Europe in 43 AD. The USA adopted the tradition in the 1800's but applied it instead to the wishbone of a turkey.





Everything was going wrong again; trouble following her wherever she went.

She cooked a chicken but not for the meat, she disliked the meat, no she needed the wishbone.

She placed the smallest finger of her left hand around the left arm of the wishbone and that of her right around the other.

She tugged, it snapped, she smiled, as her right finger was granted a wish.

Everything started to go right again, her troubles left behind... until she walked beneath a ladder.

She cooked a chicken but not for the meat...




The cue at Six Sentence Stories is the word Chicken


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35 comments:

  1. Keith, This girl must be terribly superstitious. And, what's this she doesn't like chicken? Fun read, I enjoyed it a lot. I'm playing along with the group today with I'm Not Chicken and I hope when you get time you'll stop by for a visit. Have a good day! ~Curious as a Cathy

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    1. Unbelievable isn't it? What's wronth a nice bit of chicken! Thanks Cathey.

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  2. Every time we have a chicken, my wife talks about her dad, he always let them pull the wishbone. It's a great memory for her

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  3. As kids we would fight over the wishbone. I don't think I ever shared that particular adventure with my sons. Now I buy whole chickens and chop them into pieces whacking right through that wishbone.

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    1. You can't beat a good whack! Thanks Denise.

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  4. Breaking the wishbone was always a competition between my brother and I. I had forgotten about that little tradition until I read your tale. Knock on wood.

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    1. I have no idea if kids today still do it! Thanks Val.

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  5. Nice new stories - the historical one and the one you narrated . Unique use of the cue . :)
    Best wishes,
    Moon
    https://aslifehappens60.wordpress.com

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  6. Somebody is very superstitious, isn't she? Sometimes here it's called the "pulley bone" because you pull it.

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  7. This reminds me of a great "Twilight Zone" episode starring a young William Shatner as a very superstitious newlywed. Nicely done!

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  8. This brought back fun memories of childhood, Keith! With two sisters there was always the contest of who would get to break the wishbone. I loved your story, especially the twisted ending, it made me laugh. If you life your life in the world of superstition it's bound to be your downfall someday! I actually know a couple people who take these things very seriously! It's nice to see you joining in at Six Sentence Stories! :-)

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    1. I had two brothers and we too used to argue over which of us would pull the wishbone. Great to be back at 6SS after being absent during April!

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  9. My grandmother was superstitious like that.
    can't pass the salt without putting it down
    don't sit at a table with 13 people
    and the list goes on....

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    1. I'd forgotten the salt one until you mentioned it! I believe the 13 diners dates back to The Last Supper. Thanks Brenda.

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  10. Ayiee, it should only be so simple, non?
    Really liked the rhythm of the story. (Might have been me, but there seemed to be one, maybe that repeated line, "She cooked a chicken but not for the meat..

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    1. There was indeed. Having solved one problem, she walked under a ladder which leads to very bad luck. Another wish bone required! Cheers Clark.

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  11. I think she will be buying a lot of chickens! Life is full of ups and downs. I was one that helped pull the wish bone, but never believed anything good would come from it, but it was fun pretending.

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    1. It's just a shame she doesn't like eating it! Cheers

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  12. Hi Keith - we were superstitious .. but as kids we pulled the wishbone ... now they're so soft. Turkeys are probably very tough ... deboning one is hardwork -well for me it is. Happy memories of both birds with wishbones ... Cheers Hilary

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    1. Most kids superstitious - most grow out of it, and for a few it remains with them. I'm somewhere in the middle! Thanks hilary.

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  13. Hahaha! Sometimes there's no winning! Zoe/ivy

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  14. The only time we saw a wishbone as kids was Thanksgiving or Easter - no one in my family cooked whole birds at other times during the year. Now I do make whole chickens but I always forget about the wishbone. Fun story.

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  15. Though this is not a superstition we grew up with in India, we did have many of our own!! (Wouldn't have been a good one for our family anyways as we are vegetarians!:))

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    1. There's probably a root you could snap! Thanks so much.

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  16. What a 'superstitiously' wonderful story is this. Great writing, Keith.

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    1. I crossed my fingers as I wrote it! Cheers Neel

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