Thursday, April 14, 2016

A-Z Challenge Day 12


Today's long forgotten word-related words are:-
legolept n. a person who is fascinated by words
loganamnosist n. someone who has an obsession with discovering long forgotten words 
logorrhoea n. excessive  flow of words, uncontrollable garrulity. 
lexiphanic adj. using a pretentious vocabulary or grandiose phraseology.





To call Maximilian a logolept would be something of an understatement. I often find his lexiphanic way of speaking incomprehensible. Why anyone would wish to dig up long forgotten words baffles me. He says that today’s ‘lazy-speak’ (my word, not his) is 'symptomatic of the gradational decline in the standard of articulated and scripted English'. I thought it was about time I said something about it.

“Max” I said. Big mistake!

“My name is Max-i-mil-ian” he enunciated (he once told me it was Latin for 'the greatest'. Yea, in your dreams chum!)

As I was saying, I pointed out to ‘Maximilian’ that words go out of fashion for a reason, just like some men’s names do. I bit my lip after I said the last bit but fortunately, he didn’t notice. I guess he was busily summoning up a long winded response to the first bit.

“Are you suggesting I am a loganamnosist?” he said.

“Maybe, but on the other hand maybe not” I answered, avoiding the admission I didn’t know what the hell he was on about. He then  developed a serious case of logorrhoea: it's like  diarrhoea, without the unpleasant side effects suffered by the subject and those nearby. Only kidding!

Anyway, I gave up. He will never change his ways, and Max without his archaic words just wouldn’t be Maximilian would he?




You can check out my A-Z posts thus far  by clicking  on a highlighted letter!

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36 comments:

  1. Nothing wrong with being a loganamnosist! =)

    ~Ninja Minion Patricia Lynne aka Patricia Josephine~
    Story Dam
    Patricia Lynne, Indie Author

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  2. Sometimes it is okay to let our friends be just the way they are :)

    betty

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  3. Max... I was wondering there for second or twenty if your middle name may be Max.... ?? A bit of lopsided linguistic lambasting? ;-)
    AJ at Ouch My Back Hurts

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    1. Funny you should say that, because actually ...... it's not

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  4. Excellent. Love it! Thanks for popping into my blog...brought me here...Looks really good! Might well be staying around. Cheers.

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  5. Brilliant words today, Keith. And now I know what to call you... a loganamnosist. :)

    Susan A Eames from
    Travel, Fiction and Photos

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  6. Logorrhoea! What a great word for someone who pontificates at great length using obscure words. LOVE it!

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  7. And I thought a legolept leaps with Lego's ;-)

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  8. and here I thought legolept was the ability to jump over many legos.

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    Replies
    1. I also thought Lego when I first saw the word! I guessed I wouldn't be the only one.

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  9. Fantastic! I really like this. You did an excellent job of putting the humor in the story and your play with words is also excellent.

    Shalom,
    Patricia @ EverythingMustChange

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  10. It's great that you're able to take these forgotten words and incorporate them into a well-versed story.

    G. R. McNeese from
    Project Blacklight

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  11. Perhaps we should all try to live up to our names. Now that's given me food for thought...

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  12. Very enjoyable. These rare words and the stories for context are wonderful

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  13. Ha, I love this. I adore little used words. Now, to seamlessly include them in a story is totally sublime. Wonderful.

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  14. I love that all your rare words are cognates. Great story.

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    1. I suppose this is inevitable when four different words have to fit within one story. I'm delighted you like the story

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  15. My daughter suffers with logorrhoea, or verbal diarrhea as we call it. Enjoyed reading about Max.

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  16. well we had a college- mate who was found using difficult word, i just wonder what would have happened if had been a loganamnosist instead of being a lexiphanic

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  17. I do miss a bit of old language formalities, and I mourn the loss of actual English in today's spoken and written conversation among younger people. I wonder in what manner their children will grow up conversing.
    Josie
    from Josie's Journal

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    1. I couldn't agree with you more. Thx lol.

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  18. Great fiction with the forgotten words in action.

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